Wear More than One Prescription? Learn about Multifocal Options for Contacts

06 Jun Wear More than One Prescription? Learn about Multifocal Options for Contacts

Like many individuals with more than one vision prescription, you may never have considered contact lenses.

Too many people mistakenly assume that contacts are “not for me,” or maybe you’ve tried them in the past with no success.

But with the latest advances in multifocal lens technology — as recent as April 2016 — there are now even more options for folks just like you — who need help with both distance and up close vision.

Multifocal contact lenses are an especially great choice for individuals with presbyopia — age-related difficulty seeing close-up objects that usually sets in after the age of 40. If you still need contacts for astigmatism, myopia, or others issues, along with a new prescription for reading, multifocals could be right for you.


What Are Your Options for Multifocal Contacts?

Multifocal contact lenses give you more than one prescription all on a single lens — one for viewing objects up close, and another for distance vision. Sometimes a third prescription is included for intermediate distances.

Unlike bifocals, which have a visible line between the near and far prescriptions, multifocals give you a smoother transition between prescriptions for reading and distance vision — similar to progressive eyeglass lenses.

Monovision Contact Lenses

This is where one contact is set for distance and the other is set for viewing objects up close — or for using the computer, reading, and other up-close activities.

  • With most monovision lenses, you wear a single-vision lens with a near prescription in one eye and one for distance vision in the other.
  • Modified monovision means wearing a single-vision lens in one eye and a multifocal lens in the other.

Customized Multifocal Lens Designs

There are many different multifocal lens designs that can be fit depending on the shape of your eye. This gives you the flexibility to have both eyes helping with distance and near activities.

  • Concentric circles of lens powers for various viewing distances: The most commonly used design for multifocal contacts, concentric lenses give you near correction at the center with a larger outer circle containing distance correction. Some people choose to have distance correction at the center and near vision on the outside.
  • Blended designs: With a blended design you get near and distance prescriptions close to the center of your eye, which mimics a more natural viewing experience by correcting specific points of aberration in your eye.
  • Translating Optics: These lenses allow your pupil to alternate between powers as your gaze shifts up or down. Generally, the bottom portion of the lens is used for your near prescription while the top portion corrects for distance viewing.

Contact Lens Materials

Multifocal lenses can be soft monthly, soft daily contacts, or specialty hybrid or hard lenses. Soft lenses are great for disposable contacts such as dailies or monthlies.

Hybrid multifocal lenses are typically soft around the periphery with a harder gas permeable center. Many individuals find them easier to wear than traditional gas permeable contact lenses.

How Can I Try Multifocal Contacts?

At Springfield Family Vision, you’ll find contact trials available in most prescriptions. You can visit us to try on different types of multifocal contact lenses today — right here in-house!

Don’t know how to wear contacts? No problem! We’ll be happy to show you how to put them in, take them out, and take care of them!

If you have questions about multifocal contacts or other vision care options, contact us at any time to set up an appointment. Dr. Katie looks forward to helping you find the right lens design to meet your vision care and lifestyle needs!

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